If you run a small business, or work from home, your PC is essential to your success. So having a PC that is well maintained and operates at maximum efficiency is very important. While it’s crucial to have solid anti-virus protection and spyware/malware protection programs installed on your PC, it’s also highly beneficial to have a program that can monitor and diagnose computer issues.

Don’t Let your PC Slow your Business


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The Family PC Needs Support Too!

Monday, June 17, 2013

The family PC undergoes a lot of use and stresses. Parents and children often use their PC for work and school, surfing the Internet, gaming, watching videos and movies, etc. Yet sustained and continual use of a PC by multiple users can often tax a computer to the point where it can slow down and even fail long before its lifespan is supposed to end.

The Family PC Needs Support Too!


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Keeping your PC running at its best is no easy task. Yet new diagnostic software products can help users identify and help users fix issues that may slow or hinder a PC.

What to Look for in a PC Diagnostic Product


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Boost Your PC with a PC Doctor

Friday, June 7, 2013

If you like to delve deep into the inner workings of your PC and maximize its performance, then you can benefit from having a PC Doctor on hand.

Boost Your PC with a PC Doctor


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Enums in C++ Suck

Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Like most strongly typed languages, C++ has a way to group a set of constants together as their own type called enums. Enums are extremely useful in a wide variety of circumstances. However, enums in C++ have a lot of problems, and, in fact, they're really a mess. I'm certainly not the only person to complain about this, either.

Enums don't fit in with the rest of the language. They feel like something that was tacked onto the language to me. This is purely an aesthetic issue, and the fact that they're useful in a wide variety of circumstances probably negates this.

More practically, you can't control the conversion of the enum to and from integers. For example, you can use the less than operator to compare an enum and an integer without using a cast. This can result in accidental conversions that don't make sense.

Perhaps the worst problem is the scope of the constants defined by the enum. They are enclosed in the same scope as the enum itself. I've seen a lot of code where people prepend an abbreviation of the enum's type to each of the enum's constants to avoid this problem. Adding the type to the name of a constant is always a good sign that something bad is happening.

In addition, you can't decide ahead of time what the size of your enum's type is. C++ normally tries to give the programmer as much control as possible. In the case of enums, this allows the compiler to store your enum in whatever type it wants to. Frequently, this doesn't matter, but when it does matter, you'll end up copying the value into an integer type that's less expressive than than the enum.

After the break, I'll explain what other languages are doing about it, what the next iteration of the C++ standard will do about it, and what you can do about it now.


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PC-Doctor delivers an enormous number of different products to different customers. Each customer gets a different product, and they get frequent updates to that product as well. Delivering these products requires complex synchronization between dozens of engineers. We've gotten great at scheduling the most important work. Our clients love us for that.

However, the low priority projects get released significantly less reliably. Until recently, I'd assumed that this problem was unique to PC-Doctor. Based on some extremely sketchy evidence from another company, I'm going to release my Theory Of Scheduling Low priOrity Work (TOSLOW).


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Making Regexes Readable

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Regular expressions are extremely powerful. They have a tendency, however, to grow and turn into unreadable messes. What have people done to try to tame them?

Perl is often on the forefront of regex technology. It allows multiline regexes with ignored whitespace and comments. That's nice, and it's a great step in the right direction. If your regex grows much more than that example, then you'll still have a mess.

Click through to see another solution.


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Lambda expressions and anonymous methods in C# are more complicated than you probably think. Microsoft points out that an incomplete understanding of them can result in "subtle programming errors". After running into exactly that, I'd agree. While I haven't tried it, Lambda expressions in C# 3 are supposed to do exactly the same thing.


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Developing a New Framework

Monday, May 5, 2008

This post is a bit of a change for me. I'm actually going to write about my work for PC-Doctor! I'm actually a bit embarrassed at how rare that's been.

I want to talk about how to design a brand new framework. It's not something that everyone has to do, and it's not something that anyone does frequently. However, there's very little information on the web about the differences between creating a library and a framework.


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C++0x: The Lambda Expression Debate

Sunday, April 27, 2008

The next C++ standard (C++0x) will have lambda expressions as part of the standard. N2550 introduces them. It's a short document, and it's not too painful to read. Go ahead and click it.

Like many new C++ standards, it's not clear yet how the new feature is going to be used. Michael Feathers has already decided not to use them. At least one other person seems to mostly agree. I, on the other hand, am with Herb Sutter who seems excited enough about the feature to imply that MSVC10 will have support for it. This is going to be a great feature. Incidentally, Sutter has mentioned an addition to C++/CLI in the past that would add less sophisticated lambda support for concurrency. I suspect he's serious about adding the support soon.

There have been many times when I've desperately wanted to avoid defining a one-off functor or function in my code. In fact, there have been times when I've been desperate enough to actually use Boost.Lambda! This standard is a clear win over Boost's attempts to deal with the limitations of C++03.


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